Acyl compounds

Acyl chloride molecules can vary in size up to very long molecules most of which consist of carbon atoms attached to each other and also to hydrogen atoms. Names of Acyl Chlorides in General Acyl chlorides are also known generically as acid chlorides link to equivalent page about naming acid chlorides. Acyl chlorides are named according to the same system as other organic compounds.

Acyl compounds

Electrophilic aromatic substitution Benzene rings have a delocalised pi-system of electrons, which creates areas of high negative charge. This makes aromatic compounds more prone to attacks by electrophilic reagents.

However, due to Acyl compounds high stability of benzene rings, they will only react with highly reactive electrophiles, and will only undergo substitution reactions but not addition reactions.

Acyl compounds

Benzene's unusual stability is explained by its ability to delocalise charges by resonance. Electrophilic aromatic substitution of benzene takes place in two main steps: The image below summarizes the general mechanism of an electrophilic aromatic substitution reaction.

An example of such reaction is between bromine and benzene. In this reaction, a bromine atom will substitute a hydrogen atom in the benzene ring, giving bromobenzenean aryl halide.

However, due to the unreactive nature of benzene, catalyst such as aluminium chloride is needed. The halogen atom of an aryl halide atom could be exchanged for a metal atom using an organometallic reagent. An example of such reaction is the reaction between bromobenzene and an organolithium reagent, where there is a nucleophilic attack of the lithium cation on bromine.

The formula to such reaction is: The lithium-phenyl complex C6H5Li can better delocalize the negative charge by resonating it around the benzene ring; whereas in a lithium-butyl complex C4H10Lithe molecule is not capable of such resonance and is further destabilized by the fact that the negative charge is placed on a primary carbon.Acyl group – carbonyl group attached to an alkyl or aryl group Carbonyl compounds- compounds containing carbonyl groups Carbonyl compounds can be divided into two classes: Has a group attached to the acyl group that can function as a leaving group Compound Structure Carboxylic.

Acyl group – carbonyl group attached to an alkyl or aryl group Carbonyl compounds- compounds containing carbonyl groups Carbonyl compounds can be divided into two classes: Has a group attached to the acyl group that can function as a leaving group Compound Structure Carboxylic.

Other synthetic methods

Compounds of the formula ##STR1## and their salts, in which R 1, is a C 1 -C 7 aliphatic hydrocarbon radical; X 1 is --CO; X 2 is a divalent aliphatic hydrocarbon radical which comprises an ethyl group and an alkylene of 2 to 6 carbon atoms; R 2 is hydroxy, carboxy or alkoxycarbonyl in which alkoxy is from 1 to 7 carbon atoms; X 3 is a divalent aliphatic hydrocarbon; R 3 is carboxyl or 5.

Acyl chlorides are the most reactive of the acid derivatives and can be used to make all the other derivatives (except nitriles), as well as other compounds. Acyl chlorides are easily hydrolyzed by water to give carboxylic acids. The important classes of organic compounds known as alcohols, phenols, ethers, amines and halides consist of alkyl and/or aryl groups bonded to hydroxyl, alkoxyl, amino and halo substituents respectively.

If these same functional groups are attached to an acyl group (RCO–). ACYL COMPOUNDS: SOAPS AND DETERGENTS Experiment # 8 I.

Synthesis of carboxylic acids

Objectives To observe the general properties of carboxylic acids. To compare the acidity of carboxylic acids and phenols. To verify experimentally the interconversion among acyl compounds.

Naming Acyl Chlorides : Names of Acyl Chloride Compounds : Organic Chemistry