The principles of effective description in porters the grave and whites once more to the lake

You differ from the anchorite, That solitudinarian:

The principles of effective description in porters the grave and whites once more to the lake

Railroads and Manifest Destiny.

The principles of effective description in porters the grave and whites once more to the lake

However, it recently occurred to me that the railroad truly made America in a deeper and more profound way. What first came to my attention with the effect of a light bulb switched on were the relative dates for two key events: Asa Whitney [first] submitted his plan for a Pacific railroad to Congress through his representatives in January Sullivan — in an essay about Texasbut with reference to "the railroad".

Whether they will then attach themselves to our Union or not, is not to be predicted with any certainty. Unless the projected rail-road across the continent to the Pacific be carried into effect, perhaps they may not; though even in that case, the day is not distant when the Empires of the Atlantic and Pacific would again flow together into one, as soon as their inland border should approach each other.

Nov. 5, John Porter was made a freeman in Boston, MA. In the same year Porter and his wife Margaret were In the same year Porter and his wife Margaret were members of the Roxbury church (a suburb of Boston). The Principles of Effective Description in Porter's "The Grave" and White's "Once More to the Lake" words. 2 pages. The Theme of Time in Once More to the Lake by E.B. White. words. 2 pages. Experiences at the Lake in Maine Depicted in Once More to the Lake by Elwyn Brooks White. words. Why are discourse communities important? “Code 23, 3rd floor, room ,” is heard over the intercom of the 3rd floor of the hospital. James Porter defined the discourse community as: “A local and temporary constraining system, defined by (or more generally, practices) that are unified by a common focus. A discourse community is a.

But that great work, colossal as appears the plan on its first suggestion, cannot remain long unbuilt. Langley, New York, July, The telegraph has to be part of it.

It is very difficult to asign motive to anyone, but I am convinced that there was essentially no interest in western expansion at the time of the Louisiana Purchase. The negotiations were only for New Orleans and west Florida.

The French threw in that country west of the Mississippi at the last hour. But by when settlers began moving to Oregon by the wagonload, this clearly had changed. Texas fits in here, too, but there seems to have been a mixed bag of expectations — whether it was really American expansion, or merely emigration.

Whitney's route was Great Lakes to Columbia River via South Pass — the only pass then believed practical then within the territory of the United States. Anyway, does this notion that the mere potential of the railroad opened [or played a previously unrecognized role in opening] the frontier deserve more research?

No sooner is the internet "invented" than people begin to imagine that the internet will do away with libraries, and the telephone, and yield all other kinds of marvelous things. That is the kind of thing I'm wondering about in regard to railroads.

We — railroad historians — spend a lot of time recording the development of particular technological features and the construction of miles of track, but what about the expectations that railroads inspired?

There is a story — perhaps more myth than true — that Leland Stanford told his seasick wife on their way to California that he would build her a railroad for her return journey. I wonder if people really went to California thinking they could ride a train home someday.

Indeed, many did just that, whether they imagined it would happen or not. Texas State Historical Association,makes a strong case [based on statistical analysis of the writing styles of O'Sullivan and McManus using signed articles by each of them for comparison] that Jane McManus [a staff writer for John L.

O'Sullivan, editor of the United States Magazine and Democratic Review, aka Cora Montgomery] was the real author of that editorial — as well as others. Lightning Express Trains Leaving the Junction.

Courtesy of Vanessa Rudisill Stern. It goes much deeper. Fremont, is one example, another is the Southern route. A good deal of political wrangling and compromise — and dead ends attended the railroad discussions.

It is not coincidence that the railroad was approved after the Civil War started — the South was holding out for the Southern route — and held up all others. I don't think that the Mexican War was not railroad route related — but do think that the Gadsden purchase was, even though it was one of the odder purchases made.II.—THE MAN WITH THE GOLDEN KEY.

Why did this block occur?

The very first thing I can ever remember seeing with my own eyes was a young man walking across a bridge. He had a curly moustache and an attitude of confidence verging on swagger. THE DEVIL'S DICTIONARY. AUTHOR'S PREFACE. The Devil's Dictionary was begun in a weekly paper in , and was continued in a desultory way at long intervals until In that year a large part of it was published in covers with the title The Cynic's Word Book, a name which the author had not the power to reject or happiness to approve.

THE ELAND'S RIVER GARRISON Reproduced from The Star (New Zealand), September 27, MEN WHO PRAYED TO BE PUT IN A TIGHT PLACE. To say that they were extremely annoyed would be describing their feelings too mildly. Download-Theses Mercredi 10 juin Katherine Anne Porter’s “The Grave” and E.B.

White’s “Once More to the Lake” are essays that use subjective language to illustrate the principles of effective description.

The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Souls of Black Folk, by W. E. B. Du Bois This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever.

Reports From The Boer War